Legacies

Have you considered leaving a gift in your Will? A significant portion of the GLFB’s income comes from gifts left in Wills by people who care about the work that we do in providing vital assistance to blind and partially sighted people.

It was a legacy, from our founder Sir Arthur Pearson that made the establishment of the Greater London Fund for the Blind possible in the first place.

Please help us build on our long history of helping people by mentioning the charity in your Will You do not need a great deal of wealth to make a difference as every gift in a Will for the GLFB means more lives can be changed for the better – permanently. Your legacy will help us ensure that we can continue to provide assistance to some of the most vulnerable people in society.

When writing or updating a Will it is always advisable to seek independent legal advice. If you don’t have a solicitor, the Law Society has a searchable database of firms in your locality. Their website is www.lawsociety.org.uk.

Once you have made provision for your loved ones please consider leaving a gift to the GLFB. Even a small amount can make a massive difference as every gift means another person benefits.Your legacy will help us protect future generations of blind and partially sighted people.

Every day 100 people in the UK start losing their sight. And every year, the requests for assistance increases. Your legacy gift will help ensure the GLFB is able to be there when it matters most.

Please consider supporting our work in this very special way. It costs nothing during your lifetime but will have a powerful impact for years to come.

If you would like more information on how your legacy gift could help make a difference to future generations of blind and partially sighted people please contact Raj Bhayani, Head of Appeals on 020 7620 4918.

Thank you.

Decide who will draw up your will

There are a number of options when it comes to making your Will, but we always recommend consulting a legally trained person, ideally a solicitor or your bank manager.

It may seem cheaper and easier to write a Will yourself, but a professional will ensure that all the legal formalities are correctly followed and that your Will is valid.

A valid Will gives you peace of mind that your exact wishes will be carried out in the way you intended.

Choose the type of legacy

There are several different types of legacy and choosing how to make your gift is an important decision.

Consider each option carefully and select the one that’s right for you.

Residuary legacy
This is a gift of the remainder or percentage of your estate after all other legacies have been made and debts cleared.

Residuary legacies keep up with inflation and are an effective way to divide the value of an estate between a number of people and causes that are important to you.

If you are considering what type of legacy to leave the Greater London Fund for the Blind, a residuary legacy can help your gift go further.

Pecuniary legacy
This is a gift of a fixed sum of money. The value of pecuniary legacies will decrease over time, as the cost of living increases.

Specific legacy
A particular named item left as a gift in your Will is known as a specific legacy, for example, a piece of jewellery.

Contingent gifts
Legacies made on the basis of another event happening first are called contingent gifts. For example your Will could state that a gift only applies if all other beneficiaries named in your Will die before you do.

Life interest or reversionary legacy
This is a gift which someone can benefit from in their lifetime. For instance, your house could be left for the use of a relative. When they die it could pass to someone else, or to a charity.

Get the right wording

If you have decided to remember the Greater London Fund for the Blind in your Will, your solicitor would be able to suggested how to word your bequest. (We have included below some example approaches to wording.)

Please remember to use our full name Greater London Fund for the Blind, our registered charity number 1074958 and the correct registered address which is: 11-12 Whitehorse Mews, 37 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7QD.

Example approaches to wording the different types of legacies:

Residuary bequest (a proportion of your estate)
I give ……..% of the residue of my real and personal estate which I can dispose of by Will in any manner I think proper to the Greater London Fund for the Blind (Registered Charity No. 1074958) of 11-12 Whitehorse Mews, 37 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7QD and the receipt of the Honorary Treasurer or the proper officer for the time being of the Greater London Fund for the Blind shall be a complete discharge to my executors.

Pecuniary bequest (a set sum)
I give the sum of ……. pounds to the Greater London Fund for the Blind (Registered Charity No. 1074958) of 11-12 Whitehorse Mews, 37 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7QD and the receipt of the Honorary Treasurer or other proper officer for the time being of the Greater London Fund for the Blind shall be a complete discharge to my executors.

Specific legacy bequest (a named item)
I give to the Greater London Fund for the Blind (Registered Charity No. 1074958) of 11-12 Whitehorse Mews, 37 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7QD absolutely, my (name and description of item).

Reversionary legacies / Life interest trusts
My trustees shall hold [……..] on trust for [………..] during his/her lifetime and, following his/her death, hold the capital and income for Greater London Fund for the Blind (Registered Charity No. 1074958) 11-12 Whitehorse Mews, 37 Westminster Bridge Road, London SE1 7QD and the receipt of the Honorary Treasurer or other proper officer for the time being of Greater London Fund for the Blind shall be a complete discharge to my trustees.

Make your gift work harder

Leaving a legacy to Greater London Fund for the Blind is one of the greatest gifts that you can give – you will be helping to make London a better place for blind and partially sighted people.

After you have made the decision to leave a legacy to Greater London Fund for the Blind there are several things that you can do to make your money go further.

Consider a residuary legacy
If you are not sure which type of legacy to leave the Greater London Fund for the Blind then please consider a residuary legacy. Residuary legacies retain their value because they follow inflation and are based on a portion of your estate rather than a set amount of money.

Let us know
If you have left or are considering leaving a legacy to Greater London Fund for the Blind then please let us know. By letting us know your intentions, we can thank you properly. It also enables us to plan ahead with confidence and fund more projects to help blind and partially sighted individuals.

Already have a will? Then consider using a codicil

A codicil is a legal amendment to a Will and can be used to add in a legacy to the Greater London Fund for the Blind, without going to the cost of producing an entirely new Will. However, depending on the nature and size of the planned changes, it maybe more prudent to opt for a new Will.

It’s a good idea to review your Will every now and then to make sure it still says what you want it to say. This is especially important with any major changes to your or your loved one’s individual circumstances, for example, if you have children or grandchildren.

If you choose to write a new Will, make sure your new Will clearly says that it revokes any older wills or codicils.

Glossary of legal terms

One of the things that can be off-putting for people when writing a Will is the legal language they come across. Many of us don’t use these terms in everyday life and can find it bewildering.

When taking advice, wherever possible, ask your legal adviser for clarification.

The following glossary is by no means exhaustive, but does cover many of the terms referred to during Will writing.

Beneficiaries: all those people, organisations and charities you wish to benefit under the terms of your Will.

Codicil: a legal document adding to, or altering, an existing Will. A codicil is used where only a minor change is needed and there is no need to make a new Will.

Executor(s): these are the people you appoint to carry out the terms of your Will.

Estate: the total value of all the assets you leave when you die, after all debts, taxes and costs have been paid.

Inheritance Tax: Inheritance Tax is paid if a person’s estate (their property, money and possessions) is worth more than £325,000 when they die. This is called the ‘Inheritance Tax threshold’. For further details please visit the HM Revenue & Customs website https://www.gov.uk/inheritance-tax/overview

Intestate: if you die without a Will, the law declares intestacy and decides how your assets will be distributed.

Legacy: a gift, or bequest in your Will.

Personal Chattels: these are personal belongings that have a statutory definition and include jewellery, furniture, pictures, books, cars etc (but not money, investments, property or business assets).

Probate of the Will: the document issued to Executors by the Probate Registry to authorise them to deal with the estate of the person who has died.

Testator: a person who makes a Will. Testatrix is the female version.

Trustee(s): are those people who you appoint to carry out the intentions of any trust included in your Will.

Will: the document in which you say what will happen to your possessions on your death.

Witnesses: are two people who must be present when you sign your Will.